Time To Be A #Prepper – NASA Confirms White – Red Dwarf Binary Star System – Planet X or Nibiru? #preppertalk

NASA Wise has confirmed the existence of a binary star system that is “particularly surprising”.  Check it out:

If any of the prophecies, legends, stories, tales, tablets, biblical scriptures et al that have pointed out some type of celestial event coming, NASA has certainly confirmed one possibility in space.

Will it fly by us? Is it Nibiru or Planet X? Or is it just another scientific discovery?

I certainly won’t be waiting until the last minute to figure out whether it is or not, but I will be prepping all the way!

Merry Happy Prepping!

Top 5 #Prepper Twitter Profiles – #PrepperTalk #Preppers #socialmedia

5. @zombielyptic

Twitter Description:

Fighting Global Stupidization! ZombieLyptic Is A Community Dedicated To SHTF Disaster Preparedness And Survival In A Post Apocalyptic World. Follow Me

Texas · http://www.zombielyptic.com/

About 1,400 followers

4. @snomannews

Twitter Description:

The best source on the web for emergency preparedness! Survival, guns, supplies, tea party lover, freedom expert. We follow back.

http://www.survivalnewsonline.com

Current followers: approximately 3,600

3. @isurvivalskills

Twitter Description:

Anything related to #bushcraft#survival#preparedness#preppers#preppertalk#shtf#wrol#teotwawkihttp://paper.li/isurvivalskills/1314252498 …

http://isurvivalskills.blogspot.com

Current followers: approximately 3,900

2. @beprepared_com

Twitter Description:

“Helping People Prepare for 25 years. Food Storage, Emergency Kits, Water Filtration, First Aid, MRE’s, Survival Kits, Camping Gear, Preparedness, and more.

Utah USA · http://beprepared.com

Current followers: approximately 5,000

1. @SurvivorJane

Twitter Description:

Girlie Girl once clueless about what was happening in Politics, Economy, Disasters. Passion: Educating Ppl in Survival/Preparedness Creator of #PrepperTalk

United States · http://www.survivorjane.com

Current followers: approximately 6,000

The Healthy Growing Lives of: Chives – Herb, Food, Plant & Flower

Chives: Easy Healthy Add to Liven Up Your Garden & Your Food

I have been taking a good long look at the plants I inherited when I bought my home.  I am blessed with a wonderful property, full of interesting plants, trees and animals.

Recently, for the last couple of years, my garden has been sprouting bunches of Chives.  This year is exceptional, so the following is an ode of information about and for the CHIVE.

Chives (Allium schoenoprasum) are a part of the same plant family as onions, scallions and garlic. They actually grow from small bulbs and have a long history of culinary and medicinal uses.

In the Middle Ages, chives were promoted as a cure for melancholy and believed to drive away evil spirits. Today we know that chives and chive flowers are high in vitamin C, folic acid and potassium. Therefore, they should be routinely added to recipes to help restore vital nutrients lost in cooking. This herb’s tangy aromatic taste come from its high concentration of sulfur compounds and other essential oils, which are also partly responsible for its healing properties.

Growing Chives: So Easy!!!

Chives can be started from seed but it’s easiest to find a friend that already has an herb garden and dig-up a clump of their chive plant and get started growing your fresh chives.

Once your herb garden is established and you start getting blossoms on your chive plants you’ll quickly find that it’s best to use scissors instead of pruning sheers or a knife on these plants. Scissors are especially useful when cutting your chives to prepare for your favorite dishes.

This hardy perennial grows from 12 to 24 inches tall, with pink and lavender flowers that have flavored meals for centuries. It prefers full sun and moist, well-drained soil that high in organic matter. Planting rooted clumps is the easiest way to propagate chives. Seeds germinate slowly and require darkness, constant moisture, and temperatures of 60 degrees to 70 degrees F. Divide plants every few years. Chives also grow well in containers on a sunny windowsill or on your deck mixed with other herbs or edible flowers.

It’s just unbelievable how incredibly versatile chives can be. When you have an abundance of plants in your garden you can always make a chive bouquet.

Here’s a wonderful outdoor dining idea: place a chive bouquet in the center of your picnic table or outdoor dining area, the aroma can enhance dishes placed around it!

You can even use them as dried flower arrangements. They are very easy to dry and keep as edible flowers for your salads and soups.

Chives Save Lives: Surprising Medicinal Health Benefits

You may be surprised to find that there is research that supports how chives ease stomach distress, protect against heart disease and stroke and may help the body fight bacteria that can cause disease. In addition, the herb may increase the body’s ability to digest fat.

Therapeutic Effect:The medicinal properties of chives are as varied as their uses in the kitchen. Chives stimulate the appetite and promote good digestion. They can be used to ease stomach upset, clear a stuffy nose, reduce flatulence and prevent bad breath. Combined with a low-salt diet, they help lower high blood pressure. Plus, they have a mild diuretic effect, as well as some antibacterial properties.

Components: Chives are valued for their many essential minerals, including cardiac-friendly potassium, bone-strengthening calcium and blood-building iron. And unlike most other members of the onion family, chives are high in folic acid (a B vitamin), vitamin A and vitamin C. In fact, just 3 ½ ounces of chives supplies enough vitamin C to meet your daily requirement of 60 mg.

Cold Prevention: The high vitamin C content in chives can help prevent colds. They also speed recovery if a cold develops by helping the body to expel mucus; the sulfurous compounds in chives are natural expectorants.

Cholesterol Reduction: Scientific research shows that chives stimulate the body’s digestion of fat. Eaten regularly, chives may help lower blood cholesterol levels.

The Chive Flower: Tastes as Good as It Looks

Here are a few foodie food ideas …

Don’t overlook the chive flower. The chive’s delicate purple flowers have a milder flavor than the leaves and stems and add a decorative touch to salads, herb oils and other dishes.

Chive Flavored Oil: add 1 ½ ounces of chive blossoms to 1 quart of vegetable oil. After a week, the oil will turn lilac and take on the fragrance of the chive flowers. Use the oil on salads or in cooking. Keep it refrigerated when not in use!

Chive Salt: If you like the oniony flavor of chives, make your own Chive Salt to add zip to all sorts of dishes. First, add some chive leaves to some salt. Then bake the mixture in the oven to dry the leaves and blend the flavors. Store in an airtight jar.

Cottage Cheese with Chives

  • 8 ounces of cottage cheese
  • 1 tablespoon of mustard
  • 1 shallot
  • 1 bunch chives
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • Salt to taste
  • White pepper

1. Blend the cottage cheese and mustard.

2. Peel the shallot, chip finely and mix with the cottage cheese blend.

3. Wash and dry the chives and snip them finely. Stir about two-thirds of the chives into the cottage cheese mixture.

4. Season the cottage-cheese mixture with the paprika and add salt and pepper to taste. Sprinkle the remaining chives on top.

Food & Kitchen Tips

  • Cut chives just before you are ready to use them to preserve their vitamins, aroma and flavor. Chives are delicate; to prevent the loss of essential oils, snip them with kitchen shears rather than chopping or grinding.
  •  Don’t heat chives or they will lose their valuable vitamin C as well as their digestive properties
  •  Grow chives at home in a pot on a windowsill. Wait until the plant reaches about 6 inches in height before cutting. Harvest the chive leaves frequently to prevent blooming unless you specifically want to use the flowers. Once the plant blooms, the leave become less flavorful.
  • Freeze chives for future use. Frozen chives tend to retain more flavor than dried chives. Snip fresh chives into small pieces, then place them in an ice-cube tray and fill it with water. To thaw, put a chive cube in a strainer.

We hope you enjoyed the article on Chives.

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Gardening Protection: 10 Natural Insecticides and Repellents For You to Use

Howdy Folks! Yes, I put that SH*T on my plants (see further down) to keep the bugs away!  Besides Franks, here’s a few ideas to tell those pesky insects to bug off:

Depending on the kind of vegetables you’ll be growing in your vegetable garden, the methods of getting rid of the pests will change. And since that could turn out to be a never ending topic, let’s tackle this a little differently. Given below are some general and natural insecticides for vegetable gardens that will work for any kind of vegetable garden. So take note and start moving.

Also, here is a good guide to herbs that you can grow that are also natural repellents: Your Garden: Growing Herbs That Repel Insects & Other Critters Naturally

Tomato Leaves: Take some tomato leaves and add cornstarch (1 tbs) and water (3-5 pints) and blend well in the juicer. Now strain the liquid and transfer the contents into a spray bottle. Spray around the plants for getting rid of ants in vegetable garden. Actually a whole other set of bugs as well.

Vegetable Oil Soap: Take any mild liquid soap and measure out about ½ cup of the same. Add vegetable oil (2 cups) in that and mix together in a blender. To a tablespoon of this mixture, add 1 quart of water. Use this formula to cover both sides of the leaves on our plant. Make sure that you do not use a stronger formula ‘coz it’ll be harmful for your plants. And even though this is a tedious process, it really works in answering how to get rid of bugs in houseplants as well as other insects that infest houseplants and vegetable gardens.

Garlic Spray: Take about 4 garlic cloves and chop them up. Now add them in a liter of water and let it sit through an entire night over. You can boil garlic cloves in a cup of paraffin wax as well. Now add some soap flakes to the same by grating about a level full of any mild soap bar in it. Mix the liquid well and transfer into a spray bottle. Spray over the leaves.

The other alternative to this is to add hot chillies or onions to the same. Garlic has been known to get rid of spider mites, rabbits, mosquitoes and several other garden pests. This has been seen to work wonders as a natural insecticide for basil and other plants.

I would suggest to watch the reaction of your plants after spraying with a garlic infused recipe.  Some plants may not like it.

Mixed Recipe: Mix 3 tbs of onion and garlic juice, 1 tbs pf Tabasco sauce, 3 tbs skim milk, 2 tbs baby shampoo in 1 gallon of water. Mix all ingredients well and spray all over the plants. Repeat every 10 days.

Neem Oil: Neem leaves are extremely bitter to taste and are usually used as a natural insecticide. Oil made from these leaves is also makes for one of the very effective and natural insecticides for vegetable gardens. Just dab a cotton ball into the neem oil and spread over the plants. Neem oil as insecticide will not only repel the insects but also discourage them from breeding.

Cloves: Crush several cloves in a gallon of water, mix well, let sit overnight and then use this mixture to spray over the plants. The strong smell of the cloves drives the insects away.

Wormwood Spray: Take some wormwood leaves and dry them out till you have about 15 gm of these. Add these to a liter of water and simmer for 30-40 minutes. Now cool the liquid and spray on plants. This is a strong solution and should only be used for larger pests and insects.

Cayenne Pepper (Diluted Frank’s Red Hot Sauce) – I put that SH*T on everything, including my plants.  Diluted with water of course.  Or use powdered cayenne pepper mixed with a litre of water and 1 tsp. of baby shampoo. Spray onto plants.

Crushed Mint & Cucumber Peels: Problems with ants? No more. Use this in your garden and also, along any entry points ants may have into your home. Bitter cucumbers work best.

Essential Oils: Try essential oils such as lemon balm (citronella), pennyroyal, lavender, and rose geranium mixed with 1 tsp baby shampoo and 1 litre of water. Wash before and after spending time outdoors.

The advantage of using natural insecticides for vegetable gardens is that it rids the insects without harming the plants. And that is exactly what you need in the end. Now that you know what some of the ways of controlling insects in vegetable gardens are, use them and rid the area for a cleaner and better garden.

Please make sure to follow us @stealtharmour on Twitter!

Protect Your Money: 5 “Waste Not Want Not” Food Saver Ideas

I have a few pet peeves about wasting food and sometimes it seems like its inevitable.  Hence this post.  I wanted to find the most interesting and useful tips about saving food which in turn saves money.  Here are 5 ideas that I found (with more to come):

DON’T YOU JUST HATE IT WHEN …

1. You make tomato sauce but only use a couple of spoons of tomato paste. The rest just sort of sits in the fridge till …

Enter Martha Stewart:

Most recipes call for only a small portion of tomato paste — you use a tablespoon or two, and the rest invariably goes to waste. To save the remainder: Carefully open both ends of the can with a can opener. Remove one metal end, and discard it. Leave the other in place. Wrap the entire can in plastic wrap, and freeze overnight. The next day, use the metal end to push the frozen paste out the open end. Discard can, tightly rewrap unused portion, and store in freezer up to 3 months, slicing off just as much as you need each time you cook.

(Geepers, I used to just plastic wrap and elastic it. Duh. And then it would just not be so good looking the next week.)

2. Left over pasta gets, well, you know, ewww.

Pasta is super starchy hence, when left over without proper assistance, ends up being a sticky mess.

I’ve heard that mixing in your sauce works.  I’ve tried that, but it just doesn’t taste quite the same, so what I do now is separately store the sauce and pasta.

The best thing to do is to add olive oil into the pasta while its still slightly warm, but not cold enough yet to get sticky.  Mix well, you don’t need a lot but enough to make it glossy.  Store in a ziploc bag or I just leave it in a bowl covered with a plate in the fridge overnight.

The next day, I simply boil water, drop the pasta in for no more than 30-40 seconds, and voila. The pasta is ‘refreshed’ and tastes delicious.

3. Vegetables like carrots & celery go limp in the fridge.

Part A)

While it may hold true that vegetables that have lost their ‘crispness’ in the fridge may have also lost their nutritional value, I also don’t believe they have lost all their nutritional value.

Ice cold water is the droopy vegetables saviour.  Carrots, celery, asparagus, broccoli – even lettuce, will become crisp after a 1 to 2 hour chilly soak.

Part B)

In order to avoid veggies from going limp & mouldy, wrap them up in kitchen paper first, then put them into your re-used bags or ziplocs into the veg drawer. The paper helps to reduce any moisture from getting in, resisting mould growth & help to preserve crispness.

4. A recipe calls for wine, but only 1 cup & you really won’t be drinking the rest. It’ll just sit there.

I found this on a food site for which I forgot the address. Stupid. Never thought about freezing the stuff.

Waste no wine…

Submitted by Evie, Holywood

Freeze any left-over bits of wine in yogurt pots. It all adds flavour and richness to stews, risottos, pasta sauces and even gravy and you dont have to open a new bottle every time.

5. You have no clue what to do with ‘all that stuff’ in your fridge? Oh ya, let’s make a Garbure! (It’s French for “all the stuff” soup.)

Gather up all the bits from your fridge – coarse outside lettuce leaves, that bendy carrot, bit of onion, green tops of leeks and spring onions, a few herbs, etc… Put in a pan with water to cover; add a stock cube or meat jelly or gravy or even those leftover bits of tomato sauce and boil until the veg are soft. Whizz in processor or liquidiser. The French call this ‘Garbure’ and it’s almost always delicious and different each time. Can be thickened with leftover potato, or some small pasta shapes can be added, or a cooked chopped bacon rasher. Soy sauce and a slowly poured beaten egg will make it Chinese-ish. Curry paste,and garlic, or grated cheese, or mushroom ketchup … almost any mixture you invent will taste better than a tin of soup, and it’s practically cash and additive free!

I will definitely be on the prowl for more tips & ideas, so follow us here on our blog for Part 2, Another 5 “Waste Not Want Not” Food Saver Ideas.

I would also like to thank all those who have become followers. So many of you have fabulous blogs & information on prepping, tips and so much more. Thank you.

Or please follow us on Twitter @stealtharmour

Oil of Rosemary: Science Says May Be Nature’s Best Food Preserver and Health Protector

Rosemary, the herb of love and remembrance, is steeped in thousands of years of myth and tradition. Rosemary is known to have been used for magic, healing, and seasoning since the beginnings of recorded history. Native to seaside regions of the Mediterranean and North Africa, the Latin name Rosemarinus means dew of the sea, likely a reference to the shimmering blue flowers that cover rosemary bushes in mid- winter.

Many people today love rosemary for its uplifting aroma and a delicious flavour, but it has found much wider appreciation over the years.

I looked up just a few bits and pieces of research:

A January 5th, 2012 article in Natural News writes of this scrumptious herb,

Currently, two of the most common additives used to preserve meat are BHT and BHA. But studies have linked BHA with cancer and BHT with hyperactivity, causing some consumers to avoid products containing them (read ingredients labels to find out if they’re in the foods you buy).

In a 2006 study, essential oils of rosemary and sage performed better at preventing oxidative decay and preventing loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids in meat than a combination of BHA and BHT. This means *rosemary oil and sage oil may be one of the best natural food preservers yet discovered, and instead of having detrimental side effects, these natural oils offers protective health benefits!

*please note all preppers!

The University of Maryland writes of Rosemary,

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is widely used as a spice when cooking, especially in Mediterranean dishes. It is also used for its fragrance in soaps and other cosmetics. Traditionally, rosemary has been used medicinally to improve memory, relieve muscle pain and spasm, stimulate hair growth, and support the circulatory and nervous systems. It is also believed to increase menstrual flow, act as an abortifacient (causing miscarriage), increase urine flow, and treat indigestion. Almost none of these uses have been studied scientifically in humans. However, one study in humans found that long term daily intake of rosemary prevents thrombosis.

In the lab, rosemary has been shown to have antioxidant properties. Antioxidants can neutralize harmful particles in the body known as free radicals, which damage cell membranes, tamper with DNA, and even cause cell death. Also in the lab, rosemary oil appears to have antimicrobial properties (killing some bacteria and fungi in test tubes). It isn’t known whether rosemary would have the same effect in humans.

Several studies show that rosemary inhibits foodborne pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes, B. cereus, and S. aureus.

May 2010, from McCormick Science Institute writes,

A preliminary study, funded by the McCormick Science Institute and the University of Florida was presented at the 2010 Experimental Biology Meeting. The study found that compared to baseline, individuals who consumed spices and herbs for seven days did not have higher antioxidant blood levels (ORAC). However, those who consumed paprika, rosemary, ginger, heat-treated turmeric, sage, and cumin, had fewer DNA strand breaks (either inherent or induced by hydrogen peroxide in vitro) in lymphocytes, another measure of antioxidant status.  Download the abstract (PDF)

The purpose of this study was to examine the bioavailability of 11 herbs and spices as a prelude to studying other health benefits. We hypothesized that changes in antioxidant activities in blood would be a sensitive measure of absorption.

After an overnight fast, volunteers (n=10-12 each spice) had a baseline blood draw, consumed capsules for 7 d, and returned for a second blood draw. Serum antioxidant capacity and DNA strand breaks in lymphocytes were measured. Serum antioxidant capacity was not significantly different between baseline and 7 d due to large individual variation.

Intrinsic DNA strand breaks were remarkably similar between and among subjects. Strand breaks induced by H2O2 were well controlled. A RM 2-way ANOVA measured significant differences in time and treatment for the number of strand breaks per cell or the percent of cells with strand breaks. There was no appreciable cell death during the oxidative stress phase of the experiment. Herbs and spices that did not have a significant effect were clove, black pepper, cayenne, cinnamon, and oregano.

Herbs and spices that protected lymphocytes against DNA strand breaks were paprika, rosemary, ginger, heat-treated turmeric, sage, and cumin. We conclude that compounds from these herbs and spices are absorbed.

In 2007, Dr. Keith Scott writes,

Scientists have discovered that yet another phytochemical found in the common culinary herb, rosemary protects against Alzheimer’s disease.

For several years we have been aware that the plant compound, rosmarinic acid has anti-Alzheimer’s properties. Now, a recently published research paper has described how carnosic acid (that occurs in the common culinary herbs, rosemary and sage) also has the capacity to prevent and possibly treat this distressing disease.

In ground-breaking research, scientists from Iwate University in Japan and the Burnham Institute for Medical Research in California have found that the antioxidant, carnosic acid protects the brain from free radical damage.

Oxidative damage, caused by excess free radicals is a major cause of neurodegenerative diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

Writing in the November 8 {2007} edition of the Journal of Neurochemistry the scientists involved in this research describe the novel way in which carnosic acid works to protect the brain from free radical damage.

Personally, I am happy to learn about the wonderful benefits of Rosemary, however, my two favourites uses for Rosemary are with home-fried potatoes and with BBQ lamb chops.  Yummy.

Please make sure to follow us on Twitter @stealtharmour

Garlic, Sweet Smell of Health: Benefits, Home Gardening Tips and Cold Cure Recipe

Garlic, that food we all love (or hate, but here at Stealth WE LOVE GARLIC!) has amazing medicinal uses. Recently, garlic health benefits have been the object of scientific research. Traditionally, it has been reputed as a cure for all diseases imaginable.

Listed below are some health benefits for Garlic, proper dose and what to look out for when you buy Garlic supplements at the store, along with a few home gardening tips about this wondrous food.

Garlic has always used in every aspect of cooking in Asian countries such as India and China for thousands of years. Numerous health claims have been made regarding the benefit of Garlic however only lately have any real data been presented to back some of the claims. Many companies have created their own formulations of garlic essence and garlic oil. These are being sold at health stores under names like Aged Garlic Extract, Ail, Ajo, Allii Sativi Bulbus, Allium, Camphor of the Poor, Clove Garlic, Garlic Oil, Da Suan, Lasun, Lasuna, Nectar of the Gods, Poor Man’s Treacle, Rason, Rust Treacle and Stinking Rose. The scientific name for Garic is Allium Sativum.

Fraud Warning

Be very careful buying odorless formulations of garlic supplements. If it is odorless, then it means that formulation may not contain a chemical called Allicin which is responsible for the garlic odor. Allicin is important as many health benefits from garlic. Look to make sure your product has 1.3% Alliin or 0.6% Allicin in it.

Dose

It is recommended to take 600 to 900mg of garlic tablets per day which is the equivalent of taking ½ to 1 clove of garlic a day.

Main Health benefits

Cholesterol Lowering Effects – Studies show garlic can lower your total cholesterol levels by up to 12% after taking it for 1 month. It can also lower triglyceride levels by 15% but will not raise your HDL levels (the good cholesterol levels). However the research done to estimate the figures above are heavily disputed with the current medical guidelines advising patients that garlic may have some effect but not significant clinical benefits in patients with high cholesterol.

Blood Pressure Effects – In the short term, garlic has been known to lower blood pressure by up to 10% in the systolic and diastolic readings. Most studies used the specific garlic powder formulation from Kwai and Lichtwer Pharma though some studies used the garlic extracts. The theory is that the mechanism of action of garlic is through stimulation of nitric oxide which relaxes your blood vessels and inhibition of your ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) so be careful if you are taking blood pressure medications from your pharmacy. It can cause an interaction.

Anticoagulant Effects – Garlic can make it harder for your blood to clot by reducing the ability of your platelets from sticking with each other and clotting. It also makes your blood “thinner” by reducing the viscosity or the flowabiltiy of your plasma in your blood. Be careful taking other herbal products or anticoagulant drugs like Warfarin (Coumadin) when taking high doses of garlic as it can increase your risk of bleeding out. Herbal products known to have anticoagulant effects are angelica, clove, danshen, ginger, ginkgo, red clover, turmeric, vitamin E and willow as well as a few other products. Taking fish oil supplements with garlic supplements can enhance this effect.

Gardening Garlic in Containers

This is the way I grow garlic.  I keep it separate from my other veggies that we grow.  Some veggies don’t like it.

Choosing a Garlic Variety
There are tons of garlic varieties to choose from and they are divided into two basic categories: hardneck types, which have a hard central stock with a single layer of cloves around it, and softneck types, which have swirling layers of cloves and no defined neck. I prefer hardneck varieties because they produce a flower bud called a scape in late spring. Scapes have a delicious mild garlicky flavor and taste amazing in pesto. In theory, you could plant garlic purchased from the grocery store, but it is often treated to prevent it from sprouting. For the best results and a more interesting array of varieties, buy garlic that was grown locally at a farmer’s market or purchase bulbs at a nursery.

Choosing Containers
Garlic has fairly shallow roots, but it is important to make sure they have plenty of room to stretch out in the soil. Choose a pot that is at least 18 inches deep and 12 inches wide. Half barrels and wooden crates work well, but you certainly do not need to buy a container for your garlic. The large black plastic containers that trees come in are a great choice, as are contractor buckets. Whatever container you use, make sure that it has drainage holes in the bottom. Place the container in a spot that gets at least 6 hours of bright, direct sunlight each day.

Use Good Potting Soil 
Garlic is prone to fungal root diseases, so it is important that the soil you plant the cloves in drains well. Don’t be tempted to put regular garden soil in the containers. It is too heavy and tends to get soggy over the winter. Instead use a high quality soil-less potting mix. These mixes typically contain a blend of coconut fiber or peat and compost, plus vermiculite or pearlite to help keep it light. I use a brand called Black Gold. Get the potting mix as damp as a wrung out sponge before placing it in the container. Fill the container to within about 2 inches of the rim.

Planting the Garlic
Break the garlic heads apart, being careful to keep the papery wrapper around each clove intact. Only plant the largest cloves (you can use the smaller ones to cook with).
Plant the garlic 2 inches in from the rim of the container, spacing the bulbs 5 inches apart in all directions. Use a piece of bamboo to make planting holes that are 3 inches deep. Plant one clove per hole, with the flat side down and the pointy end up. Backfill the hole with soil, making sure that the tip of the clove is about 1 inch below the surface. The garlic may sprout and then die back over the winter, but don’t worry. It will re-sprout again in the spring.

Caring for the Garlic Over the Winter
In very cold areas, you can place straw over the surface of the soil during periods where temperatures stay below freezing for an extended period of time. However, be prepared to remove it when temperatures rise, as the straw tends to stay damp and it will rot the garlic cloves. Skip using straw if you have wet, mild winters. In dry climates, don’t let the soil completely dry out. Keep it about as damp as a wrung out sponge.

Caring for the Garlic in Spring
In spring be sure to remove straw (if using it) as soon as temperatures rise above freezing. When the garlic begins to grow, fertilize it every 3 weeks with a dilute liquid organic fertilizer. Keep the soil consistently moist. Cut the scapes off just after they emerge to encourage the bulbs to grow larger. The bulbs will be ready for harvest in early summer when the bottom 1/3 of the leaves have yellowed.

However, I do cheat when spring comes.  The bulbs I start begin to sprout and I then put them into good potting soil in containers.

Cheap and Effective Cold Cure – Garlic & Ginger Soup (Recipe)

What you need:

A pack of Ramen Noodles (or whatever Chinese style soup noodles are around, cheap)

2 cups water

Lots of garlic (depends on your taste, but more is better)

Fresh ginger (or powder if you have)

Frozen or fresh veggies cut up into small pieces such as broccoli, green beans, red peppers, peas, carrots etc.

1 Tablespoon of sesame oil

Chili-garlic sauce (mm mm good) to taste

How to do it:

1) Boil the 2 cups of water along with the Ramen flavouring packet.

2) Add your garlic and ginger.

3) If you have frozen veggies add them and boil them out part of the way.  You will need the final 2 minutes for the noodles.

4) If you have fresh veggies, I suggest only slightly longer than blanching them.  I like mine pretty raw. Add them in.

5) For the final two minutes, add in your noodles and cook till done.

6) As an addition, I like to put in leftover chicken, beef or pork, cubed down small.  Frozen shrimp too.

7) Eat it up, yum.

This really helps me when I have a cold. Soothing, hot and HOT!

Garlic is an amazing food that is not to hard to grow, a benefit to your health and above all, really, really tasty!

P.S. For all you preppers, powdered garlic is said to have the same benefits.  Dehydrate and grind down.  Can be stored for up to 5 years in airtight containers.

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