Time To Be A #Prepper – NASA Confirms White – Red Dwarf Binary Star System – Planet X or Nibiru? #preppertalk

NASA Wise has confirmed the existence of a binary star system that is “particularly surprising”.  Check it out:

If any of the prophecies, legends, stories, tales, tablets, biblical scriptures et al that have pointed out some type of celestial event coming, NASA has certainly confirmed one possibility in space.

Will it fly by us? Is it Nibiru or Planet X? Or is it just another scientific discovery?

I certainly won’t be waiting until the last minute to figure out whether it is or not, but I will be prepping all the way!

Merry Happy Prepping!

Top 5 #Prepper Twitter Profiles – #PrepperTalk #Preppers #socialmedia

5. @zombielyptic

Twitter Description:

Fighting Global Stupidization! ZombieLyptic Is A Community Dedicated To SHTF Disaster Preparedness And Survival In A Post Apocalyptic World. Follow Me

Texas · http://www.zombielyptic.com/

About 1,400 followers

4. @snomannews

Twitter Description:

The best source on the web for emergency preparedness! Survival, guns, supplies, tea party lover, freedom expert. We follow back.

http://www.survivalnewsonline.com

Current followers: approximately 3,600

3. @isurvivalskills

Twitter Description:

Anything related to #bushcraft#survival#preparedness#preppers#preppertalk#shtf#wrol#teotwawkihttp://paper.li/isurvivalskills/1314252498 …

http://isurvivalskills.blogspot.com

Current followers: approximately 3,900

2. @beprepared_com

Twitter Description:

“Helping People Prepare for 25 years. Food Storage, Emergency Kits, Water Filtration, First Aid, MRE’s, Survival Kits, Camping Gear, Preparedness, and more.

Utah USA · http://beprepared.com

Current followers: approximately 5,000

1. @SurvivorJane

Twitter Description:

Girlie Girl once clueless about what was happening in Politics, Economy, Disasters. Passion: Educating Ppl in Survival/Preparedness Creator of #PrepperTalk

United States · http://www.survivorjane.com

Current followers: approximately 6,000

Protect Your Money: 5 “Waste Not Want Not” Food Saver Ideas

I have a few pet peeves about wasting food and sometimes it seems like its inevitable.  Hence this post.  I wanted to find the most interesting and useful tips about saving food which in turn saves money.  Here are 5 ideas that I found (with more to come):

DON’T YOU JUST HATE IT WHEN …

1. You make tomato sauce but only use a couple of spoons of tomato paste. The rest just sort of sits in the fridge till …

Enter Martha Stewart:

Most recipes call for only a small portion of tomato paste — you use a tablespoon or two, and the rest invariably goes to waste. To save the remainder: Carefully open both ends of the can with a can opener. Remove one metal end, and discard it. Leave the other in place. Wrap the entire can in plastic wrap, and freeze overnight. The next day, use the metal end to push the frozen paste out the open end. Discard can, tightly rewrap unused portion, and store in freezer up to 3 months, slicing off just as much as you need each time you cook.

(Geepers, I used to just plastic wrap and elastic it. Duh. And then it would just not be so good looking the next week.)

2. Left over pasta gets, well, you know, ewww.

Pasta is super starchy hence, when left over without proper assistance, ends up being a sticky mess.

I’ve heard that mixing in your sauce works.  I’ve tried that, but it just doesn’t taste quite the same, so what I do now is separately store the sauce and pasta.

The best thing to do is to add olive oil into the pasta while its still slightly warm, but not cold enough yet to get sticky.  Mix well, you don’t need a lot but enough to make it glossy.  Store in a ziploc bag or I just leave it in a bowl covered with a plate in the fridge overnight.

The next day, I simply boil water, drop the pasta in for no more than 30-40 seconds, and voila. The pasta is ‘refreshed’ and tastes delicious.

3. Vegetables like carrots & celery go limp in the fridge.

Part A)

While it may hold true that vegetables that have lost their ‘crispness’ in the fridge may have also lost their nutritional value, I also don’t believe they have lost all their nutritional value.

Ice cold water is the droopy vegetables saviour.  Carrots, celery, asparagus, broccoli – even lettuce, will become crisp after a 1 to 2 hour chilly soak.

Part B)

In order to avoid veggies from going limp & mouldy, wrap them up in kitchen paper first, then put them into your re-used bags or ziplocs into the veg drawer. The paper helps to reduce any moisture from getting in, resisting mould growth & help to preserve crispness.

4. A recipe calls for wine, but only 1 cup & you really won’t be drinking the rest. It’ll just sit there.

I found this on a food site for which I forgot the address. Stupid. Never thought about freezing the stuff.

Waste no wine…

Submitted by Evie, Holywood

Freeze any left-over bits of wine in yogurt pots. It all adds flavour and richness to stews, risottos, pasta sauces and even gravy and you dont have to open a new bottle every time.

5. You have no clue what to do with ‘all that stuff’ in your fridge? Oh ya, let’s make a Garbure! (It’s French for “all the stuff” soup.)

Gather up all the bits from your fridge – coarse outside lettuce leaves, that bendy carrot, bit of onion, green tops of leeks and spring onions, a few herbs, etc… Put in a pan with water to cover; add a stock cube or meat jelly or gravy or even those leftover bits of tomato sauce and boil until the veg are soft. Whizz in processor or liquidiser. The French call this ‘Garbure’ and it’s almost always delicious and different each time. Can be thickened with leftover potato, or some small pasta shapes can be added, or a cooked chopped bacon rasher. Soy sauce and a slowly poured beaten egg will make it Chinese-ish. Curry paste,and garlic, or grated cheese, or mushroom ketchup … almost any mixture you invent will taste better than a tin of soup, and it’s practically cash and additive free!

I will definitely be on the prowl for more tips & ideas, so follow us here on our blog for Part 2, Another 5 “Waste Not Want Not” Food Saver Ideas.

I would also like to thank all those who have become followers. So many of you have fabulous blogs & information on prepping, tips and so much more. Thank you.

Or please follow us on Twitter @stealtharmour

Oil of Rosemary: Science Says May Be Nature’s Best Food Preserver and Health Protector

Rosemary, the herb of love and remembrance, is steeped in thousands of years of myth and tradition. Rosemary is known to have been used for magic, healing, and seasoning since the beginnings of recorded history. Native to seaside regions of the Mediterranean and North Africa, the Latin name Rosemarinus means dew of the sea, likely a reference to the shimmering blue flowers that cover rosemary bushes in mid- winter.

Many people today love rosemary for its uplifting aroma and a delicious flavour, but it has found much wider appreciation over the years.

I looked up just a few bits and pieces of research:

A January 5th, 2012 article in Natural News writes of this scrumptious herb,

Currently, two of the most common additives used to preserve meat are BHT and BHA. But studies have linked BHA with cancer and BHT with hyperactivity, causing some consumers to avoid products containing them (read ingredients labels to find out if they’re in the foods you buy).

In a 2006 study, essential oils of rosemary and sage performed better at preventing oxidative decay and preventing loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids in meat than a combination of BHA and BHT. This means *rosemary oil and sage oil may be one of the best natural food preservers yet discovered, and instead of having detrimental side effects, these natural oils offers protective health benefits!

*please note all preppers!

The University of Maryland writes of Rosemary,

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is widely used as a spice when cooking, especially in Mediterranean dishes. It is also used for its fragrance in soaps and other cosmetics. Traditionally, rosemary has been used medicinally to improve memory, relieve muscle pain and spasm, stimulate hair growth, and support the circulatory and nervous systems. It is also believed to increase menstrual flow, act as an abortifacient (causing miscarriage), increase urine flow, and treat indigestion. Almost none of these uses have been studied scientifically in humans. However, one study in humans found that long term daily intake of rosemary prevents thrombosis.

In the lab, rosemary has been shown to have antioxidant properties. Antioxidants can neutralize harmful particles in the body known as free radicals, which damage cell membranes, tamper with DNA, and even cause cell death. Also in the lab, rosemary oil appears to have antimicrobial properties (killing some bacteria and fungi in test tubes). It isn’t known whether rosemary would have the same effect in humans.

Several studies show that rosemary inhibits foodborne pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes, B. cereus, and S. aureus.

May 2010, from McCormick Science Institute writes,

A preliminary study, funded by the McCormick Science Institute and the University of Florida was presented at the 2010 Experimental Biology Meeting. The study found that compared to baseline, individuals who consumed spices and herbs for seven days did not have higher antioxidant blood levels (ORAC). However, those who consumed paprika, rosemary, ginger, heat-treated turmeric, sage, and cumin, had fewer DNA strand breaks (either inherent or induced by hydrogen peroxide in vitro) in lymphocytes, another measure of antioxidant status.  Download the abstract (PDF)

The purpose of this study was to examine the bioavailability of 11 herbs and spices as a prelude to studying other health benefits. We hypothesized that changes in antioxidant activities in blood would be a sensitive measure of absorption.

After an overnight fast, volunteers (n=10-12 each spice) had a baseline blood draw, consumed capsules for 7 d, and returned for a second blood draw. Serum antioxidant capacity and DNA strand breaks in lymphocytes were measured. Serum antioxidant capacity was not significantly different between baseline and 7 d due to large individual variation.

Intrinsic DNA strand breaks were remarkably similar between and among subjects. Strand breaks induced by H2O2 were well controlled. A RM 2-way ANOVA measured significant differences in time and treatment for the number of strand breaks per cell or the percent of cells with strand breaks. There was no appreciable cell death during the oxidative stress phase of the experiment. Herbs and spices that did not have a significant effect were clove, black pepper, cayenne, cinnamon, and oregano.

Herbs and spices that protected lymphocytes against DNA strand breaks were paprika, rosemary, ginger, heat-treated turmeric, sage, and cumin. We conclude that compounds from these herbs and spices are absorbed.

In 2007, Dr. Keith Scott writes,

Scientists have discovered that yet another phytochemical found in the common culinary herb, rosemary protects against Alzheimer’s disease.

For several years we have been aware that the plant compound, rosmarinic acid has anti-Alzheimer’s properties. Now, a recently published research paper has described how carnosic acid (that occurs in the common culinary herbs, rosemary and sage) also has the capacity to prevent and possibly treat this distressing disease.

In ground-breaking research, scientists from Iwate University in Japan and the Burnham Institute for Medical Research in California have found that the antioxidant, carnosic acid protects the brain from free radical damage.

Oxidative damage, caused by excess free radicals is a major cause of neurodegenerative diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

Writing in the November 8 {2007} edition of the Journal of Neurochemistry the scientists involved in this research describe the novel way in which carnosic acid works to protect the brain from free radical damage.

Personally, I am happy to learn about the wonderful benefits of Rosemary, however, my two favourites uses for Rosemary are with home-fried potatoes and with BBQ lamb chops.  Yummy.

Please make sure to follow us on Twitter @stealtharmour

Garlic, Sweet Smell of Health: Benefits, Home Gardening Tips and Cold Cure Recipe

Garlic, that food we all love (or hate, but here at Stealth WE LOVE GARLIC!) has amazing medicinal uses. Recently, garlic health benefits have been the object of scientific research. Traditionally, it has been reputed as a cure for all diseases imaginable.

Listed below are some health benefits for Garlic, proper dose and what to look out for when you buy Garlic supplements at the store, along with a few home gardening tips about this wondrous food.

Garlic has always used in every aspect of cooking in Asian countries such as India and China for thousands of years. Numerous health claims have been made regarding the benefit of Garlic however only lately have any real data been presented to back some of the claims. Many companies have created their own formulations of garlic essence and garlic oil. These are being sold at health stores under names like Aged Garlic Extract, Ail, Ajo, Allii Sativi Bulbus, Allium, Camphor of the Poor, Clove Garlic, Garlic Oil, Da Suan, Lasun, Lasuna, Nectar of the Gods, Poor Man’s Treacle, Rason, Rust Treacle and Stinking Rose. The scientific name for Garic is Allium Sativum.

Fraud Warning

Be very careful buying odorless formulations of garlic supplements. If it is odorless, then it means that formulation may not contain a chemical called Allicin which is responsible for the garlic odor. Allicin is important as many health benefits from garlic. Look to make sure your product has 1.3% Alliin or 0.6% Allicin in it.

Dose

It is recommended to take 600 to 900mg of garlic tablets per day which is the equivalent of taking ½ to 1 clove of garlic a day.

Main Health benefits

Cholesterol Lowering Effects – Studies show garlic can lower your total cholesterol levels by up to 12% after taking it for 1 month. It can also lower triglyceride levels by 15% but will not raise your HDL levels (the good cholesterol levels). However the research done to estimate the figures above are heavily disputed with the current medical guidelines advising patients that garlic may have some effect but not significant clinical benefits in patients with high cholesterol.

Blood Pressure Effects – In the short term, garlic has been known to lower blood pressure by up to 10% in the systolic and diastolic readings. Most studies used the specific garlic powder formulation from Kwai and Lichtwer Pharma though some studies used the garlic extracts. The theory is that the mechanism of action of garlic is through stimulation of nitric oxide which relaxes your blood vessels and inhibition of your ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) so be careful if you are taking blood pressure medications from your pharmacy. It can cause an interaction.

Anticoagulant Effects – Garlic can make it harder for your blood to clot by reducing the ability of your platelets from sticking with each other and clotting. It also makes your blood “thinner” by reducing the viscosity or the flowabiltiy of your plasma in your blood. Be careful taking other herbal products or anticoagulant drugs like Warfarin (Coumadin) when taking high doses of garlic as it can increase your risk of bleeding out. Herbal products known to have anticoagulant effects are angelica, clove, danshen, ginger, ginkgo, red clover, turmeric, vitamin E and willow as well as a few other products. Taking fish oil supplements with garlic supplements can enhance this effect.

Gardening Garlic in Containers

This is the way I grow garlic.  I keep it separate from my other veggies that we grow.  Some veggies don’t like it.

Choosing a Garlic Variety
There are tons of garlic varieties to choose from and they are divided into two basic categories: hardneck types, which have a hard central stock with a single layer of cloves around it, and softneck types, which have swirling layers of cloves and no defined neck. I prefer hardneck varieties because they produce a flower bud called a scape in late spring. Scapes have a delicious mild garlicky flavor and taste amazing in pesto. In theory, you could plant garlic purchased from the grocery store, but it is often treated to prevent it from sprouting. For the best results and a more interesting array of varieties, buy garlic that was grown locally at a farmer’s market or purchase bulbs at a nursery.

Choosing Containers
Garlic has fairly shallow roots, but it is important to make sure they have plenty of room to stretch out in the soil. Choose a pot that is at least 18 inches deep and 12 inches wide. Half barrels and wooden crates work well, but you certainly do not need to buy a container for your garlic. The large black plastic containers that trees come in are a great choice, as are contractor buckets. Whatever container you use, make sure that it has drainage holes in the bottom. Place the container in a spot that gets at least 6 hours of bright, direct sunlight each day.

Use Good Potting Soil 
Garlic is prone to fungal root diseases, so it is important that the soil you plant the cloves in drains well. Don’t be tempted to put regular garden soil in the containers. It is too heavy and tends to get soggy over the winter. Instead use a high quality soil-less potting mix. These mixes typically contain a blend of coconut fiber or peat and compost, plus vermiculite or pearlite to help keep it light. I use a brand called Black Gold. Get the potting mix as damp as a wrung out sponge before placing it in the container. Fill the container to within about 2 inches of the rim.

Planting the Garlic
Break the garlic heads apart, being careful to keep the papery wrapper around each clove intact. Only plant the largest cloves (you can use the smaller ones to cook with).
Plant the garlic 2 inches in from the rim of the container, spacing the bulbs 5 inches apart in all directions. Use a piece of bamboo to make planting holes that are 3 inches deep. Plant one clove per hole, with the flat side down and the pointy end up. Backfill the hole with soil, making sure that the tip of the clove is about 1 inch below the surface. The garlic may sprout and then die back over the winter, but don’t worry. It will re-sprout again in the spring.

Caring for the Garlic Over the Winter
In very cold areas, you can place straw over the surface of the soil during periods where temperatures stay below freezing for an extended period of time. However, be prepared to remove it when temperatures rise, as the straw tends to stay damp and it will rot the garlic cloves. Skip using straw if you have wet, mild winters. In dry climates, don’t let the soil completely dry out. Keep it about as damp as a wrung out sponge.

Caring for the Garlic in Spring
In spring be sure to remove straw (if using it) as soon as temperatures rise above freezing. When the garlic begins to grow, fertilize it every 3 weeks with a dilute liquid organic fertilizer. Keep the soil consistently moist. Cut the scapes off just after they emerge to encourage the bulbs to grow larger. The bulbs will be ready for harvest in early summer when the bottom 1/3 of the leaves have yellowed.

However, I do cheat when spring comes.  The bulbs I start begin to sprout and I then put them into good potting soil in containers.

Cheap and Effective Cold Cure – Garlic & Ginger Soup (Recipe)

What you need:

A pack of Ramen Noodles (or whatever Chinese style soup noodles are around, cheap)

2 cups water

Lots of garlic (depends on your taste, but more is better)

Fresh ginger (or powder if you have)

Frozen or fresh veggies cut up into small pieces such as broccoli, green beans, red peppers, peas, carrots etc.

1 Tablespoon of sesame oil

Chili-garlic sauce (mm mm good) to taste

How to do it:

1) Boil the 2 cups of water along with the Ramen flavouring packet.

2) Add your garlic and ginger.

3) If you have frozen veggies add them and boil them out part of the way.  You will need the final 2 minutes for the noodles.

4) If you have fresh veggies, I suggest only slightly longer than blanching them.  I like mine pretty raw. Add them in.

5) For the final two minutes, add in your noodles and cook till done.

6) As an addition, I like to put in leftover chicken, beef or pork, cubed down small.  Frozen shrimp too.

7) Eat it up, yum.

This really helps me when I have a cold. Soothing, hot and HOT!

Garlic is an amazing food that is not to hard to grow, a benefit to your health and above all, really, really tasty!

P.S. For all you preppers, powdered garlic is said to have the same benefits.  Dehydrate and grind down.  Can be stored for up to 5 years in airtight containers.

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10 Unusual and Useful Hiding Places for Valuables at Home

Burglars don’t want to be seen or heard, so if they do enter your home, they want to be out quick. Break-in, run-out.  Money, jewellery and small electronics are the choice prizes for most of these culprits, since small to pocket and carry is what they want.

1. A Decoy Can Be The Best Place to Hide

There are several ways to distract burglars, the best one being to leave out a decoy.  One of my favourites I’ve heard is to leave a jewellery box on your bedroom dresser or a box in your sock drawer that contains $50-$200 in cash, some fake gold & cubic zirconia jewellery plus one key with the label, “safety-deposit box”.  Albeit you may lose a few bucks, the illusion has been created and the deal sealed with a fake safety-deposit key.  The burglars will take that and run, as the majority of break and enters last no longer than 10 minutes from start to finish.

Always remember, burglars can’t afford to be seen or heard, so they need to be quick.  With adrenaline pumping, their decisions will be immediate and reactive to what they have found.  A decoy is a perfect way to satisfy them.

Other great places to consider:

2. Sew an extra “pocket” at the bottom-back of long window curtains (not sheers).

3. An empty, opaque aspirin, medicine or vitamin bottle. Roll up your money, use an elastic & insert.

4. Tape your money envelope & even small jewellery (use duct tape, a handy person’s best friend!) to the bottom of your dining room or kitchen table.

5. Tape your stuff to the bottom of your cat’s litter box. Or in the alternative, wrap it up in skid marked underwear (ewww is all I said when I heard that one!)

6. A couple of coffee cups, with your valuables taped inside, upside down in the dishwashing rack or machine.

7. Suitcases or chests with false bottoms.

8. There is usually a compartment hidden at the bottom of stand up and table lamps.  As long as you are careful (electricity), its a good stashing place.

9. Hidden crawl spaces underneath your home.  Air ducts in an apartment.

10. In plain sight specialty modified items, such as furniture & even documents, like these (which I love!):

And to top off the good, here’s a few of the worst I’ve heard:

Sock & underwear drawers

Glove compartment of car (like really?)

Stereo equipment

Mattresses

The biggest suggestion when hiding your valuables is to have a second person you can trust to know where they are.  This holds true especially in the case of the elderly because should they pass, their valuables may accidentally end up either being thrown out or eventually sold at a garage sale.

Since burglars don’t want to be seen or heard, we suggest our quality security laminates for basement windows, patio doors and 1st floor windows. No burglar is going to try bashing glass over and over.  Otherwise, we hope that the ideas above help with securing your valuables.

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Easy, Delicious and Simple: White Cake Recipe with Applesauce Topping

Can’t help but love yummy food.  Decided to use up all the apples that are starting to have a few too many bruises here and there to make up and sauce.  Along with a homemade white cake that I love.  Thought I would share the recipe. My son claims its like eating a ‘cookie-dough’ cake.

Ingredients for White Cake

  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 3/4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 cup milk

Ingredients for Applesauce Topping

  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons butter
  • 5-6 beautiful apples, macintosh, jazz (I use a combo)
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • Cinnamon, ginger, allspice, clove, nutmeg (you decide)

Directions for Applesauce Topping (make 1st)

  1. Peel, core & cut apples into chunks.
  2. In a medium saucepan & starting on a higher heat, drop in butter. Don’t burn but when melted, add in apples and sugar. Bring up to almost “a boil”.  Cover and let simmer on a low heat.
  3. The apples will become super soft, so you can break them apart with a fork, creating a hearty applesauce.
  4. Once white cake has been baked, serve as topping or side sauce.

Directions for White Cake

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour a 9×9 inch pan or line a muffin pan with paper liners.
  2. In a medium bowl, cream together the sugar and butter. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the vanilla. Combine flour and baking powder, add to the creamed mixture and mix well. Finally stir in the milk until batter is smooth. Pour or spoon batter into the prepared pan.
  3. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes in the preheated oven. For cupcakes, bake 20 to 25 minutes. Cake is done when it springs back to the touch.

This recipe is simple, easy & no fuss. Plus, its super delicious.  My 8 year old tells me its like eating cookie dough cake with apples and cinnamon.